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WRENTHAM AVENUE
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WRENTHAM AVENUE

Red brick and steel framed windows to extension of Queens Park house
De Rosee Sa have redesigned and refurbished a Victorian townhouse in Queen’s Park. The area around Queen’s Park was developed from 1875, and was named to honour Queen Victoria. In 1879, The Royal Agricultural Society held its annual show on the area which would become Queen’s Park. The 100 acre site was chosen for its proximity to the railway network, Queen’s Park Station having opened in 1879. Located to the north of the railway line which originally connected London to Birmingham, the property lies outside the Queen’s Park conservation Area.
Originally organised as three separate flats when purchased by our clients, DRS applied for and obtained consent from the Local Authority for a conversion into a single dwelling house. 
The property was wide enough to introduce a decent side door down the side of the property, which created a covered side entrance at lower ground floor level, with a cloakroom and dog basket. De Rosee Sa moved the traditional staircase so that there is a central double-height hall that links the lower ground and raised ground floor together. Coming into the property through the more formal front door, the large hall gives a glimpse to the more contemporary use of space on the lower ground floor.
A more formal raised ground floor has a study at the front overlooking the street which goes through to a library/gallery that looks over the double height hall. Towards the garden is a formal sitting room with open fireplace and a bay window overlooking the garden. The bay window leads to a terrace, over the roof of the new garden extension with black steel railings to match the steel window frames.
The lower ground floor extension is full-width, and although contemporary, was purposefully clad in red bricks matching the original house to appear more timeless. There are three openings in the garden extension: a central double door and two fixed full-height windows either side, all in black steel.
The clients had a beautiful collection of framed art, so the interiors form an elegant backdrop for the artwork, objects and furniture. De Rosee Sa designed the kitchen, bathrooms and joinery to be sympathetic to the character of the house and its objects.
The extensive rear garden was replanted. At the front, the property has off-street parking and although it was important to retain the parking, soft planting was used to ensure the front garden was not dominated by hard standing.
As our clients include an author, De Rosee Sa designed and obtained planning for a single-storey writer’s studio in the bottom of the garden.
WRENTHAM AVENUE

2015

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WRENTHAM AVENUE

2015

Red brick and steel framed windows to extension of Queens Park house
De Rosee Sa have redesigned and refurbished a Victorian townhouse in Queen’s Park. The area around Queen’s Park was developed from 1875, and was named to honour Queen Victoria. In 1879, The Royal Agricultural Society held its annual show on the area which would become Queen’s Park. The 100 acre site was chosen for its proximity to the railway network, Queen’s Park Station having opened in 1879. Located to the north of the railway line which originally connected London to Birmingham, the property lies outside the Queen’s Park conservation Area.
Originally organised as three separate flats when purchased by our clients, DRS applied for and obtained consent from the Local Authority for a conversion into a single dwelling house. 
The property was wide enough to introduce a decent side door down the side of the property, which created a covered side entrance at lower ground floor level, with a cloakroom and dog basket. De Rosee Sa moved the traditional staircase so that there is a central double-height hall that links the lower ground and raised ground floor together. Coming into the property through the more formal front door, the large hall gives a glimpse to the more contemporary use of space on the lower ground floor.
A more formal raised ground floor has a study at the front overlooking the street which goes through to a library/gallery that looks over the double height hall. Towards the garden is a formal sitting room with open fireplace and a bay window overlooking the garden. The bay window leads to a terrace, over the roof of the new garden extension with black steel railings to match the steel window frames.
The lower ground floor extension is full-width, and although contemporary, was purposefully clad in red bricks matching the original house to appear more timeless. There are three openings in the garden extension: a central double door and two fixed full-height windows either side, all in black steel.
The clients had a beautiful collection of framed art, so the interiors form an elegant backdrop for the artwork, objects and furniture. De Rosee Sa designed the kitchen, bathrooms and joinery to be sympathetic to the character of the house and its objects.
The extensive rear garden was replanted. At the front, the property has off-street parking and although it was important to retain the parking, soft planting was used to ensure the front garden was not dominated by hard standing.
As our clients include an author, De Rosee Sa designed and obtained planning for a single-storey writer’s studio in the bottom of the garden.